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Tag: Philosophy of intelligence

Is a chess player and intelligence analyst? – Chess and intelligence

FelixMittermeier – https://pixabay.com/it/photos/scacchi-pezzi-degli-scacchi-2730034/

Pili, Giangiuseppe, (2019) “Is a chess player and intelligence analyst? How to learn from chess how to improve intelligence analysis”, American Intelligence Journal, Vol 36, Issue 2, 74-85


It is with a distinct pleasure and honor that I announce my last publication in the esteemed American Intelligence Journal – The journal for intelligence professionals! AIJ is one of the oldest American journals of intelligence studies and it is one of my favorites. When I read the email today my heart jumped (safely!, safely!). For a young researcher in the field of intelligence grow up with the documentaries of the WWII, and personal appreciation for what US have done during the Cold War, I couldn’t have been more happy to see my name inside that journal. I want personally to thank again many people that helped me in delivering the paper: Michael Landon-Murray (assistant professor), Claudio Selleri (Le Due Torri, Publisher), Herman Grooten (IM, trainer and great chess writer), Uberto Del Prato (CM, and environment intelligence practitioner), Roman Kolodii (intelligent and careful reader), Matteo Canini (neuro-psychologist who provided the psychological literature about chess and intelligence), and last but not least the editor of the journal, professor William Spracher. Thank you all for all your help and support!

Intelligence and Social Epistemology – Toward a Social Epistemological Theory of Intelligence

Giangiuseppe Pili (2019): Intelligence and Social Epistemology – Toward a Social Epistemological Theory of Intelligence, Social Epistemology, DOI: 10.1080/02691728.2019.1658823


Yes, I know what you are thinking: “Pili stroke again! I cannot miss it!” Indeed, it is my first publication in a Q1 Journal of Philosophy, one of the best in the Social Epistemology field. Social Epistemology is a autoritative journal of philosophy. But this is not the real point. The point is that this is a first attempt toward a social epistemological theory of intelligence in a philosophical journal. It is my third paper on the epistemology of intelligence (after Epistemology and Intelligence – Some philosophical problems to be solved and Intelligence and social knowledge – A philosophical inquiring on the social epistemological nature of intelligence as a state institution) and this marks a real progress toward what I think a real epistemological theory of intelligence should be. Then, follow the progress if you like this project and don’t miss the next step of this exciting research project! Finally, if you want the gist of the paper, please, feel free to write me at scuolafilosofica_AT_gmail.com!

Keep in touch, guys!


Abstract

Toward a Philosophical Definition of Intelligence – International Journal of Intelligence, Security and Public Affairs

Giangiuseppe Pili, (2019), “Toward a Philosophical Definition of Intelligence“, The International Journal of Intelligence, Security, and Public Affairs, 21:2, 162-190, DOI: 10.1080/23800992.2019.1649113

It is with my great pleasure to announce my last issue in the International Journal of Intelligence, Security and Public Affairs!: Toward a philosophical definition of intelligence. This is my second paper in the journal and my third on the topic in a peer-reviewed journal (and a new one is coming, so keep in touch!). However, I am particularly proud of this scientific result, as far as the topic is one of the most relevant in the field, as it was defined by Mark Phythian and Peter Gill in one of their best papers. The two scholars stressed the importance of the definitional debate inside the intelligence studies literature. This paper tries to bring analytic philosophy to intelligence as state institution in order to give a new definition of intelligence. I want to thank two anonymous reviewers, who significantly helped me in improving the paper with their comments and suggestions.


What is intelligence? A short question, which is difficult to answer. In fact, there is no general agreement on the definition of intelligence. A good philosophical analysis starts with intuitions, which can be found in the literature. After the recollection of these intuitions and their discussion, it is necessary to add some rational justifications of them. I want to express a general definition of intelligence, whose formulation is indebted to a philosophical analytic approach that considers some different alternatives. Intelligence is a vague word and it has different meanings. In fact, the intelligence studies are so rich but they pose some particular philosophical problems. Philosophy defines complex and complicated words in a simple and coherent way. I want to defend a definition, which is philosophically consistent and meaningful for intelligence studies. Is this a good way to solve such a complex problem? As Ludwig Wittgenstein said: “The problems are solved, not by giving new information, but by arranging what we have always known. Philosophy is a battle against the bewitchment of our intelligence by means of language”.

Is a chess player an intelligence analyst? – Learning from other disciplines how to improve intelligence analysis

Would you like to help the scientific research in the field? Are you interested in chess and intelligence analysis? Please, write to the author (scuolafilosofica_at_gmail.com) and ask him for the first draft of the paper!


Abstract

Is a chess player an intelligence analyst? Chess is considered one of the most interesting strategic games in the Western culture. Although the artificial intelligence applied to chess beats the world champion since 1997, chess is still one of the most challenging strategic games for our intelligence and understanding. Even though chess is a perfect information game, namely a game in which the players have all the information available at the same time for each position, chess is sufficiently complex and difficult to be unsolvable by sheer calculation. Chess players face uncertainty, tactical dilemmas, strategic conundrums, stress, pressure and great epistemological problems. Chess players deal with these problems all the time and they face them using knowledge and foreknowledge of the opponent’s capability and intentions to try to solve difficult problems in the chessboard. All they have is information to be translated in practical knowledge. They are aware that the opponent will do his/her best to win the game as he/she does. Ultimately, chess players analyze the position and the opponent’s threats and weaknesses in order to ground rational decisions. Intelligence analysts face similar problems to pursue a similar goal and they face them in an analogous fashion. In this paper, I will explore how Grand Master and ordinary chess players analyze the positions from both a strategic and tactical perspectives and I will show how the intelligence analysts can learn from them. After half a century the first chess computer appeared to the scene and hundreds of years of chess studies, we are still learning how to play better in the chessboard. Chess is still the most esteem and competitive game of our culture and it is time to bring it with all its complexity to the intelligence community in order to learn from it.

Epistemology and Intelligence – Some philosophical problems to be solved

E’ con mio grande piacere annunciare la pubblicazione del mio articolo Epistemology and intelligence (https://doi.org/10.1080/23800992.2018.1532180) nella rivista internazionale The international Journal of Intelligence, Security, and Public Affairs. Invito tutti gli interessati a segnalarmi eventualmente il loro interesse e nel frattempo li rimando alla pagina del giornale.


Giangiuseppe Pili (2018) Epistemology and Intelligence – Some Philosophical Problems to be Solved, The International Journal of Intelligence, Security, and Public Affairs, 20:3, 252-270, DOI: 10.1080/23800992.2018.1532180

The International Journal of Intelligence, Security, and Public Affairs, 2018


I want to consider puzzles that must be solved to formulate a theory of epistemology of intelligence. My aim is not to build a theory. I want to create the foundations of a good approach to an epistemological theory of intelligence. To reach this step, unsolved problems must be considered; I formulate them in an analytical manner, that is, I consider them as philosophical puzzles, similar to epistemology. This is the preliminary step toward a new way of thinking about old issues. We must face our primary difficulties in the best manner, that is, we need an epistemology of intelligence.